Zhuzhing Up The Bedroom

 

First of all, how funny is it that that is how you spell it?? Not sure how I never knew this before, but I digress. So in the hopes of getting my apartment together (thanks to my pal Anne who helped me get started in a big way), I am getting rid of stuff, but also need some newness. I am starting with the bedroom and am completely captivated by this cool mesh canopy that is sure to make us feel like we’re in Tulum all the time (as long as we have earplugs to drown out the sirens and honking horns!)

 
I’ve always loved the idea of a wall-mounted reading lamp next to the bed and this one is so mid-century minimal-chic. 
A pretty lidded seagrass hamper gives a pretty ethnic vibe while hiding your dirty laundry.

 

I’ve always had a thing for Indian-hand-blocked sheets and these are from PB Teen, so more affordable than the usual!
You can never go wrong when your bedroom smells like a “log fire” So sexy and cozy all at once.
 
 
And now I am sharing my resource for great sheepskin rugs which are the perfect things to put on either side of the bed.

24 Comments

  • Reply October 3, 2017

    dahlia

    As a fellow middle-aged white woman, I wish to kindly note that “ethnic vibe” is a wincingly white-centric phrase, dear, in its attribution of ethnicity as a generic attribute that belongs to other cultures. Does that make sense? It implies an us-norm and everyone else is a generalized “ethnic” other. Best is to refer to the culture from which a thing arises, or in the case of a random home accessory, perhaps to note that it looks hand-woven, which I think is the sort of quality you were appreciating. Love to you; may your nesting be sweet.

    • October 3, 2017

      Ita Darling

      Dropped down to comments to say this. Using the word “Ethnic” implies you can’t be bothered to google where an item originated from.

      In this case I am going to guess Senegal or Ethiopia.but even if you said “East African vibes” or “Handmade /Textural touch” it would still be better.

      I live in South Africa and I have a similar one in my bedroom. They are imported from the East.

    • October 3, 2017

      Lynn

      I enjoyed this post. Must we be *so* sensitive to Every. Single. Word? Honestly, it’s getting old.
      99.99% of us would have never thought twice about what was written. Thanks for turning it into a negative.

    • October 3, 2017

      Edie

      I think your response is an unnecessarily sensitive reaction to Andrea’s use of “ethnic.” A quick dictionary definition for the word ethnic, produces this:
      “pertaining to or characteristic of a people, especially a group (ethnic group) sharing a common and distinctive culture, geography or the like.”
      Certainly the basket featured in this post has a pattern that is characteristic and readily attributable to an ethnic group.

  • Reply October 3, 2017

    Allison Tray

    That scone is GORGE. My friend has a set hanging in the living room at her B&B and they look so chic.

  • Reply October 3, 2017

    V*

    O. M. G. !!!!
    What the F%@# is wrong with you idiots! It’s ETHNIC!!! So F*ing What!!! Made in China!!!
    Who gives a Sh*t!!!!! You Bitches need to get laid!!!!

    • October 3, 2017

      Alexa

      Whoa.
      Let’s all just take a deep breath now.

  • Reply October 3, 2017

    Dahlia

    Exactly, Edie. And when white people use the word “ethnic” in a generalized fashion, what it means is: not a part of my standardized white reality. That way of using the word used to be common, and these days is considered by many thoughtful people to be impolite or racist. I pointed this out very kindly, because I believe that good people point accidental/casual slights like that to one another so that they can learn and make different choices if they wish. I shared this information kindly, gave two explanations in hopes of best clarity, offered an alternative way of describing the aesthetic point that I thought Andrea was trying to make, and wished her well. I consider that kind, thoughtful conversation among well-intentioned people, which Andrea certainly appears to me from her lovely bog, of which I’ve been a long-time daily reader. I thought she’d like to know. And now she does, and she can chose in the future as she wishes. I’ll have nothing more to say upon the topic; I’ve made my point.

  • Reply October 3, 2017

    dahlia

    Hey, kind moderator: when I, dahlia, responded to Edie, the form showed me her name, her email address, and then posted my words as if they were hers (her second post is me writing!) I thought it was weird that the form was showing me her email in my reply, but didn’t realize until I saw it on the page it was posting AS her. Would you please be so kind as to delete that and my original comment today? I intended my words in a friendly, useful fashion, and I want nothing to do with the direction of this conversation. I also really do not want all these angry, mean women to be seeing my address like I saw Edie’s. Thank you, and geez, sorry! Note to self: never talk to strangers on the internet about anything political, even when you intend it kindly.

  • Reply October 3, 2017

    Lady Macbeth

    Dahlia: I agree with you that the word “ethnic” is problematic, and I wouldn’t use it myself because it does smack of “otherness” (although, to be honest, it never caught my attention when I read this post).

    However, I do think your original post was incredibly smug and holier-than-thou. First of all, you called Andrea “dear” (patronising much?) and you then continued with the condescending attitude by asking “Does that make sense?”. I think it’s wholly appropriate to gently point out that someone might have made an error, but not when you drip with smugness while doing it.

    • October 3, 2017

      Edie

      Hi,

      I only commented once in polite disagreement to Dahlia’s comment with a definition of the word ethnic. The second Edie comment was actually Dahlia’s. There must be some glitch in the blog system where it attributed to me. I agree that Dahlia’s tone was smug to Andrea and that there shouldn’t be made a big deal using the word ethnic. Thank you.

  • Reply October 3, 2017

    Debra

    Wow. Did not expect a post about zhuzhing a bedroom to get turned up to 11 in the comments section. Current state of world affairs has us on edge. Totally get it. Peace and love to all today.

  • Reply October 3, 2017

    jennifer lee baker

    HATERS. Andrea just wants to zhuzh up her bedroom and share fun stuff. Thanks Babe! x

  • Reply October 3, 2017

    Christine

    Wow, Andrea. One never knows what will stir up the clickbait. This means, we need an entire post on ETHNIC clothing to wear with the furry jackets of autumn. Oriental, chicanx, harem style… let’s go!

    My favorite source for ethnic decor is World Market Cost Plus, which I used to visit during trips to California, but now I see they have a store in Chelsea. I had these curtains refashioned to fit my kitchen window, added tassels and it has made my galley kitchen look very Topkapi Palace.
    https://www.worldmarket.com/product/gold-and-teal-ikat-aberdeen-cotton-curtain.do?sortby=ourPicksAscend&from=fn

  • Reply October 3, 2017

    Lois Joy Johnson

    Love that Diptyque candle too especially in fall/ winter ! But…I spell it zsuzsing…like Zsa Zsa.
    xoLo

    • October 3, 2017

      alinett

      Ha! This version is actually in the dictionary! xx

  • Reply October 3, 2017

    Mamavalveeta03

    I love it ALL!!! Thanks for sharing your rug source!

  • Reply October 3, 2017

    KHD

    It’s a free country, so I thought. Andrea should be able to say whatever/however she wants, especially when there was no intent to offend.

  • Reply October 3, 2017

    Martine

    I love you Andrea and your wonderful command of the English language!

  • Reply October 4, 2017

    Renee

    Thank you Andrea for introducing me to my new favorite word: Zhuzh. I love it and I’m gonna find a way to use it every day!

  • Reply October 4, 2017

    Elle

    I love this blog and love this post! I do understand the use of “ethnic” though. It is rather laden. Hope there’s a way to keep the fun and try a better work around. We all are sensitive to different things – different words are loaded for different people. Being sensitive isn’t a fault but a gift and helps us see the value in others. That’s why I love being a New Yorker – every day I’m learning about different people from different places.

    Also I thought there was comment moderation? The one from V I think we all could have done without.

    • October 5, 2017

      Dahlia

      Thank you, Ita, for making such a thoughtful and informative reply.

      I am not someone who regularly goes about correcting others online. I’ve actually never had a conversation quite like this before.

      I made my original comment on this post out of genuinely intended of kindness. I found I WANT TO BE HER through seeking out online now the folks at Sassy, which I enjoyed me when I was young. I have been a daily reader for years now because I came to adore Andrea, both her bright love for her family and for her friends in the way she introduces them in their guest posts and her wonderful sense of style; that combination is what I liked about this blog. In my social circles it is considered thoughtful to gently tell a friend when they say something they do not realize is offensive to others. Of course this is a conversation to take care with, but in my world one doesn’t let one’s friends inadvertently use borderline racist words without letting them know as kindly as you can.

      I am not surprised that there were people who didn’t understand what I was saying, as this use of the word ethnic used to be so common, and looking at a familiar word in a new light can be a difficult shift. This is why I asked if my point made sense, not out of condescension, but just actually asking if I had explained what I was trying to say such that it that made sense.

      I used the same terms of endearment I always use when I speak. In my work I offer comfort to others, and they are often in a great deal of pain or approaching death; I have come to speak love openly, easily. Calling Andrea dear arose from my genuine affection. If you were going to tell someone you cared about something you thought they’d want know but that might make them wince a little, you’d cushion your words with love, right?

      Having my intended tone so misread was disheartening, but I am grateful to Lady Macbeth for explaining how my words read to her. Thank you. Being spoken to with great vitriol wasn’t particularly hurtful in itself; if you live in big cities your whole adult life, you learn to let random ugly stuff flow past. That someone would direct such rage at me about of a small, kindly-intended bit of information because it related to race was quite saddening. That someone’s wish to speak to me with such rage was condoned by someone moderating the conversation, that really hurt. Thank you, Elle, for speaking to that.

  • Reply October 5, 2017

    Ita Darling

    I have been traveling the last four days I haven’t looked back to what happened in this comment thread.

    A few notes
    1. If you are “tired” of public discourse on words and their meaning and “it’s getting old” then your white privilege is strong. You need to read more.

    2. The word Ethnic is used as a blanket term to describe things that you can’t place a finger on- from food, to a POC heritage, to fashion/decor. The movement to eliminate this word is not unlike how “Oriental” was phased out of popularity.

    3. Using a dictionary reference but also not googling the other side (e.g. “Why is word ethnic problematic”) and also reading the alternative viewpoints the perhaps reconsider your ability to understand others. Some examples of my quick Google search

    Not just about food:
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2016/04/22/the-great-ethnic-food-lie/

    Zoe Saldana from 2014:
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/women/womens-life/11185662/Zoe-Saldana-Is-it-time-to-drop-the-word-ethnic-from-our-vocabulary.html

    Completely on Point blog post from Justina Blakely 2013:
    https://www.jungalow.com/2013/10/the-old-tired-lazy-ethnic-label.html

    4. Dahlia- do not apologize for speaking up and trying to do it nicely.! We should all be open to learning and growing even if we just talking about a laundry basket.

    5. Andrea- I am a long time follower and regular commenter- I never mean disrespect, but even if it’s Your Blog- I feel like blogs are a two way street- you make content- we read it, we click through to advertisements, support what you sell (and sometimes buy it directly from you or from affiliate links whicbyiu also benefit from) and htat in turn gives me the right to give you feedback as your audience member. You can obviously block me, I can obviously unfollow you, but I like you and your content so I don’t want to do that.

    • October 7, 2017

      Mamavalveeta03

      Smart response, Ita Darling.

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